Melo Isn’t Getting Calls… And the Numbers are Staggering

Tommy Dee

I’ve watched enough Knicks games and NBA games in general to understand that a whistle can control and dominate a game in the same way a player can. And when a player combines dominance offensively WITH whistles you can put all your numbers away… that players team is going to be a championship contender.

We here get a kick out of telling the other side of numbers, but the truth is I appreciate numbers. I appreciate them more when they validate what I see with my own two eyes.

Carmelo Anthony hasn’t been getting respect in the form of foul calls and it’s been this way, consistently, since he’s been traded.

I’ve taken the time to look up some numbers from his career stats and game logs and here’s what we’ve found to validate he’s not getting the same calls going to the basket in the regular season. Regular season games are critical for playoff positioning.

First, let’s make a simple point. We won’t confuse you with formulas or rate usage, we’ll use basic math combined  with basketball logic backed by results in those numbers. Melo is a supreme ,alpha-male post player. He’s can’t be guarded on the left block or elbow, and is pretty good going to his left on the right block. He gets to the basket whenever he wants and that progression should lead to contact and foul calls. Why? Because his defender is usually moving in reverse in a vulnerable defensive position and doesn’t want to get dunked on. So there’s almost always contact.  With that said…

  • Let’s start basic. Just look at his FTA per game in Denver. He had years of 8.9 per game FOR THE SEASON. Since the trade he’s attempting 7 FTA per game.
  • In his 7 plus seasons in Denver spanning 564 games Melo averaged > 10 FTAs 22.5 times per year or > 10 FTs 180/564= 32% of games played.  Since he’s come to NY that number has shrunk to 18% of games played 17/92.
  • In those same 564 games in Denver Melo attempted > 15 FTs 41 times. Since joining the Knicks that number has again shrunk to 4/91.

So, if you like Melo or you hate Melo, if you’re being fair, ask yourself what’s changed?

I have to say I share in Melo’s frustrations, because the evidence is clear and having a player who gets those foul calls is an absolute commodity, but he has to do a MUCH better job containing his emotions and this should change.